Razer Iskur V2 review: Ample bottom chair

The Razer Iskur V2 leaves a little extra room to work with, providing additional comfort.

Razer
1

Having tried out my share of gaming chairs, I've come to notice over the year that a lot of them have one thing in common. They feel comfortable at first, but that comfort level often varies depending on the way a person shifts throughout the day. I'm not a person who can sit still for a lengthy period. Not many people are. That's part of why I feel like I'm going to come to love the Razer Iskur V2 even more over time. It already feels like a comfortable chair on its own, but for somebody like me who likes to shift his legs around, it stays comfortable even as I'm constantly on the move.

Out of the box

Razer Iskur V2 in its original packaging

Assembly on the Razer Iskur V2 was a quick process, which was both surprising and refreshing given that it came packaged in a massive 72+ pound box. Unboxing was simple with every component helpfully organized and easy to find. A helpful pair of gloves was also included to help aid with comfort when it came time to twist in the chair's supports. Everything went in place easily, no more difficult than an average IKEA assembly job.

The only minor con is that in lieu of an instruction booklet, the instructions are on a single poster-sized paper that can take up a lot of space. Like most assembly jobs, this will be easier with a second person to assist, but you won't need any other outside tools to put this chair together. Plus, now that Razer has committed itself to being fully eco-friendly, disposal was a simple matter of putting any leftover foam containers into the blue recycling bin.

For the wider bottom

The Razer Iskur V2 in a messy office setting

A fully-assembled Razer Iskur V2 will dazzle with its sleek black leather design. It includes 4D armrests, a seat base that features high-density foam cushions covered in an EPU-grade leather, and a seat back that features a lumbar support cushion inside the chair. This is a welcome change from the average gamer chair that utilizes an external lumbar pillow, which most times just feels like it's in the way. The Iskur V2's lumbar support adapts to the user's movements in most cases, though the shift is so subtle that I barely notice it. With that said, there hasn't been a moment where I've felt like the lumbar support was intrusive or causing any body aches. There are knobs on each side of the chair where the lumbar support can be adjusted vertically, as well as inward and outward, though the default position has honestly worked well enough for me that I haven't needed to touch these knobs at any point.

The chair's base is made out of a molded foam. It's comfortable for long sessions and ideal for the remote worker. A big plus is that it feels comfortable even when shifting around. The chair is designed with enough space to sit cross-legged. Thanks to the lumbar support, switching positions doesn't compromise comfort. The Iskur V2 is also ideal for the huskier person, specifically those with a more ample bottom. The Iskur V2 is able to hold up to 300 pounds, and the base's shape makes the chair comfortable even for those who are starting to gain some extra weight with age.

There are times when remote workers, like myself, will need to take a break and that's another area where the Iskur V2 shines. Sometimes, I'll need to get up to stretch, but other times, I need to just relax a little more. Reclining on the Iskur V2 feels like a dream. It's safe for a person to lean back without feeling like they'll fall over. It's also nice to pull on the reclining lever and fall back to a 152-degree angle. The lumbar support makes lying back for a quick break a breath of fresh air. While I can't imagine ever sleeping in a gaming chair, I can at least see how it's possible with the Iskur V2's design.

The big downside to that idea, however, is the headrest. While I can appreciate Razer eschewing the external lumbar pillow that's usually the bane of a gaming chair's design, the company instead opted for an external Memory Foam head cushion. While the rest of the Iskur V2's design feels modern, the head pillow and its straps feel almost primitive, made worse by how often I've had it slip off the chair during this review.

Chair for work and play

Razer Iskur V2 with focus on the Memory Foam head cushion

The Razer Iskur V2 prides itself as a chair meant to aid with comfort and better posture. I feel like it's too early to speak on how well it'll work on my posture long-term, if it even does at all. In the short term, I love the different ways I can sit in this thing compared to my old IKEA office chair. I'll lean back at a 110-degree angle, one leg across the wide base, the other dangling in the air, swiveling from left and right, and it never feels like I'm in danger of falling over. The lumbar support always feels like it's working. At worst, I don't even notice it, which counts for a lot compared to some of the aforementioned exterior pillows that feel like they're in the way or taking up too much space.

The armrests are fully adjustable, meant for a user to switch around between work mode and gaming time, but I never feel like I quite hit that right spot with them, so I've just stopped fiddling with them entirely.

Even with a few minor gripes, I'm perfectly happy with the Razer Iskur V2. The extra freedom in leg mobility goes a long way for me. For everyone else, it's good for sitting, and it might even be good for a quick nap. Just know, however, that this extra comfort is going to come at a steep price, so be wary of that going in.


This review is based on a unit provided by Razer. The Razer Iskur V2 is available now starting at $649 USD.

Senior Editor

Ozzie has been playing video games since picking up his first NES controller at age 5. He has been into games ever since, only briefly stepping away during his college years. But he was pulled back in after spending years in QA circles for both THQ and Activision, mostly spending time helping to push forward the Guitar Hero series at its peak. Ozzie has become a big fan of platformers, puzzle games, shooters, and RPGs, just to name a few genres, but he’s also a huge sucker for anything with a good, compelling narrative behind it. Because what are video games if you can't enjoy a good story with a fresh Cherry Coke?

Review for
Razer Iskur V2
8
Pros
  • Easy assembly
  • Comprehensive lumbar support
  • Wider base allows for leg shifting
  • Visually pleasing to the eye
Cons
  • Troublesome external head cushion
  • Finding an ideal armrest adjustment was tough
  • Pricey
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